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May 27, 2009

CSI Professor Solomon Golomb receives the 2009 USC Academic Senate Distinguished Faculty Service Award

Solomon Golomb, a professor in the Communication Sciences Institute of the Electrical Engineering Department at USC, was one of three faculty honored with the 2009 USC Academic Senate Distinguished Faculty Service Award. The two other faculty to receive this honor were Sandeep Gupta (Electrical Engineering) and Maja Mataric' (Computer Science). All three are from the Viterbi School of Engineering. Professor Golomb was honored for his mentoring work in the departments of Electrical Engineering and Mathematics, service on a wide array of School of Engineering and University committees, and for past service as President of the USC Faculty Senate. More details can be found on the following news article: "Viterbi School Sweeps Academic Senate Honors".

Professor Golomb has had a long and an illustrious career and has won many awards including the Claude E. Shannon Award and the Richard W. Hamming Gold Medal of the IEEE. He holds dual membership in the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering. He has over 250 publications and has made significant contributions in the areas of communication theory, information theory, combinatorial analysis and number theory. Professor Golomb has been at USC since 1963.

April 30, 2009

CSI Student K. Raj Kumar receives honorable mention for the 2009 Best EE Student Paper Award

K. Raj Kumar, a Ph.D. student in the Communication Sciences Institute of the Electrical Engineering Department at USC, recently received an honorable mention for his research paper at the 2009 Best EE Student Paper Award Ceremony. Raj's paper is co-authored with his advisor Prof. Giuseppe Caire, and is titled "Coding and Decoding for the Dynamic Decode and Forward Relay Protocol." The paper was presented at the IEEE International Symposium on Information Theory (ISIT, Toronto 2008), and will soon appear as a journal article in the IEEE Transactions on Information Theory. An ArXiv pre-print can be found here: ArXiv Pre-print.

K. Raj Kumar is a Ph.D. student in the Communication Sciences Institute at the University of Southern California, working with his advisor Prof. Giuseppe Caire. His research is in the broad areas of Information Theory and Code Design for wireless communication systems. He received the B.E. degree in Electronics and Communications Engineering from the University of Madras, and the M.Sc.(Engg.) in Electrical Communication Engineering from the Indian Institute of Science. In addition to the 2009 award, Raj was awarded the Oakley fellowship from the USC graduate school for the 2007-08 academic year, and the 2006 Best Student Paper Award from the Department of Electrical Engineering at USC.

April 30, 2009

CSI Student Ozgun Bursalioglu receives honorable mention for the 2009 Best EE TA Award

Ozgun Bursalioglu, a Ph.D. student in the Communication Sciences Institute of the Electrical Engineering Department at USC, recently received honorable mention for the 2009 Best EE Teaching Assitant Award. This was based on her outstanding performance as a Teaching Assistant for the course "Information Theory" (EE565A), a graduate course in the Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering at USC. Ozgun's research is in the area of communication systems, and was recently featured in the first annual Annenberg fellows research event (see news story below).

Ozgun Bursalioglu Yilmaz is a Ph.D. student working with Prof. Caire at Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Southern California (USC) where she was honored with Dean's Graduate Fellowship and USC Annenberg Graduate Fellowship Awards. Previously she received M.S. and B.S. degrees from University of California, Riverside (2006) and Middle East Technical University (METU), Ankara, Turkey (2004), respectively. Her senior design project was selected for the "Innovative and Robust Design Award" by METU Electrical Engineering Department. She received the best student paper award with her co-authors at the International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, Toulouse, France, May 2006.

April 28, 2009

CSI Professor Michael J. Neely receives the Viterbi School of Engineering Junior Research Award

Michael J. Neely, an Assistant Professor in the Communication Sciences Institute of the Department of Electrical Engineering at USC, is the recipient of the 2009 Viterbi School of Engineering Junior Research Award. This award recognizes his research in the area of stochastic network optimization.

Michael J. Neely received B.S. degrees in both Electrical Engineering and Mathematics from the University of Maryland, College Park, in 1997. He then received a 3 year Department of Defense NDSEG Fellowship for graduate study at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he received an M.S. degree in EECS in 1999 and a Ph.D. in 2003. During the Summer of 2002, he worked as an intern in the Distributed Sensor Networks group at Draper Labs in Cambridge. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Communication Sciences Institute (CSI), within the Electrical Engineering Department at the University of Southern California. His research interests are in the areas of stochastic network optimization and queueing theory, with applications to wireless, satellite, mobile ad-hoc networks, and switching systems. He has co-authored a Foundations and Trends text on stochastic network optimization and cross-layer control (FnT 2006), and is part of the Junior team of the DARPA Information Theory for Mobile Ad-Hoc Networks project (IT-MANET). Michael received the NSF Career award in 2008. He is a member of Tau Beta Pi and Phi Beta Kappa.

April 28, 2009

CSI Professor Urbashi Mitra recieves the Viterbi School of Engineering Dean's Faculty Award for Service

Urbashi Mitra, a professor in the Communication Sciences Institute of the Electrical Engineering Department at USC, recently received the 2009 Dean's Faculty Award for Service in the Viterbi School of Engineering. This award complements her 2008 Mentoring award. These awards recognize her contributions as a mentor to faculty and students and as an advocate of the Women in Science and Engineering (WISE) program.

Urbashi Mitra received the B.S. and the M.S. degrees from the University of California at Berkeley in 1987 and 1989 respectively, both in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Prior to commencing the Masters degree, she was a visiting research assistant at the Signal Processing Laboratory of the Tampere University of Technology, Finland. From 1989 until 1990 she worked as a Member of Technical Staff at Bellcore in Red Bank, NJ. In 1994, she received her Ph.D. from Princeton University in Electrical Engineering. From 1994 to 2000, Dr. Mitra was a member of the faculty of the Department of Electrical Engineering at The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. In 2001, she joined the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, where she is currently a Professor.

Dr. Mitra is currently an Associate Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Information Theory and the IEEE Journal of Oceanic Engineering. She was an Associate Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Communications from1996 to 2001. Dr. Mitra served two terms as a member of the IEEE Information Theory Society's Board of Governors (2002-2007). She is the recipient of: USC Mellon Mentoring Award (2008), IEEE Fellow (2007), Texas Instruments Visiting Professor (Fall 2002, Rice University), 2001 Okawa Foundation Award, 2000 Lumley Award for Research (OSU College of Engineering), 1997 MacQuigg Award for Teaching (OSU College of Engineering), 1996 National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Award, 1994 NSF International Post-doctoral Fellowship, 1998 Lockheed Leadership Fellowship, 1987 California Microelectronics Fellowship. She has co-chaired the IEEE Communication Theory Symposium at ICC 2003 in Anchorage, AK and the first ACM Workshop on Underwater Networks at Mobicom 2006, Los Angeles, CA. Dr. Mitra was the tutorials Chair for IEEE ISIT 2007 in Nice, France and the Finance Chair for IEEE ICASSP 2008 in Las Vegas, NV. Dr.Mitra has held visiting appointments at: the Institut EURECOM , Rice University and Stanford University. She served as co-Director of the Communication Sciences Institute at the University of Southern California from 2004-2007.

April 28, 2009

CSI Professor Alan Willner receives the 2009 Leadership Award New Focus/Bookham Prize from the Optical Society of America

Alan Willner, a professor in the Communication Sciences Institute of the Electrical Engineering Department at USC, has received the 2009 Leadership Award New Focus/Bookham Prize from the Optical Society of America. The award recognizes: 1) An individual or group of optics professionals whose actions or policy outside the technology arena has made a significant contribution to society; this contribution may be social, economic, political or humanitarian; or 2) An individual or group whose action, policy or support has made a significant impact on the field of optics. The award was established in 1997 to strengthen the link between the optics community and the public.

The citation for this award reads "for several key contributions to optical science and engineering through professional society leadership, journal editorships, and education in the classroom and in short courses at conferences." The award is presented at the Annual Meeting of the OSA (Frontiers in Optics 2009), to be held in San Jose, CA, in October 2009.

Founded in 1916, the Optical Society of America (OSA) was organized to increase and diffuse the knowledge of optics, pure and applied. The purposes of the Society are scientific, technical and educational. OSA brings together optics and photonics scientists, engineers, educators, technicians and business leaders. Its membership totals more than 14,000 individuals from over 81 countries. Approximately 40% of the Society's members reside outside the United States.

Alan's selection for the 2009 OSA Leadership Award New Focus/Bookham Prize is a well-deserved recognition of his many achievements in optics and photonics education and professional service. Alan has a distinguished research record in the fields of photonics, fiber optic communications, and optoelectronic systems and devices, and this award honors his many additional contributions to the field. Please join me in congratulating him.

Alan Willner received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Columbia University. He was a Postdoctoral Member of the Technical Staff at AT&T Bell Laboratories (Crawford Hill) and a Member of Technical Staff at Bellcore. He is currently Professor of Electrical Engineering - Systems at the University of Southern California. He is the Associate Director for the USC Center for Photonics Technology, is Co-Director of the USC Communications Sciences Institute, and was an Associate Director for Student Affairs for the NSF Engineering Research Center in Multimedia. Prof. Willner has served on several scientific advisory boards for small companies. Prof. Willner has over 600 publications, including 1 book. His research is in the area of optical communications, optical signal processing, optical networks, fiber optics, and optical device technologies.

In addition to the current prize, Prof. Willner has received the following awards: the Presidential Faculty Fellows Award from the White House, the David & Lucile Packard Foundation Fellowship in Science & Engineering, the National Science Foundation National Young Investigator Award, the Fulbright Foundation Senior Scholar Lecturing and Research Fellowship, the Institute of Electronic and Electrical Engineers (IEEE) Lasers & Electro-Optics Society (LEOS) Distinguished Lecturer Award, the IEEE LEOS Distinguished Service Award, the USC Associates Award for University-Wide Excellence in Teaching, the USC/TRW Best Engineering Teacher Award, the USC/Northrop Outstanding Junior Engineering Faculty Research Award, the 2001 Eddy Paper Award from Pennwell Publications for the Best Contributed Technical Article (across all 30 magazines in Pennwell's Advanced Technology Division) and the Armstrong Foundation Memorial Prize for the highest-ranked EE graduate student at Columbia Univ. He is a Fellow of the IEEE and the Optical Society of America (OSA), and he was a Fellow of the Semiconductor Research Corp.

April 23, 2009

CSI Student Ozgun Bursalioglu's research is highlighted in the USC Annenberg fellows research event

Ozgun Bursalioglu, a Ph.D. student in the Communication Sciences Institute of the Electrical Engineering Department at USC, will have her research featured in the Annenberg fellows research event (Town and Gown, April 27). Her work treats the question "How can I get the same digital TV broadcast on all my electronic devices?" Ozgun is working in this area with her advisor, Professor Giuseppe Caire. Read more about her work and the work of other Annenberg scholars in the following USC news article: Scholars Who Shout `Eureka!'.

Ozgun Bursalioglu Yilmaz is a Ph.D. student working with Prof. Caire at Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Southern California (USC) where she was honored with Dean's Graduate Fellowship and USC Annenberg Graduate Fellowship Awards. Previously she received M.S. and B.S. degrees from University of California, Riverside (2006) and Middle East Technical University (METU), Ankara, Turkey (2004), respectively. Her senior design project was selected for "Innovative and Robust Design Award" by METU Electrical Engineering Department. She received best student paper award with her co-authors at International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, Toulouse, France, May 2006.

March 30, 2009

CSI Professor Andreas Molisch wins Wireless Educator of the Year award from Global Wireless Education Consortium

Andreas Molisch, a professor in the Communication Sciences Institute of the Electrical Engineering Department at USC, has won the Wireless Educator of the Year award for 2009 from the Global Wireless Education Consortium. The award recognizes Andy as an outstanding faculty in the area of wireless communications, and honors his contributions to engineering education.

Andreas F. Molisch received the Dipl. Ing., Dr. techn., and habilitation degrees from the Technical University Vienna (Austria) in 1990, 1994, and 1999, respectively. From 1991 to 2000, he was with the TU Vienna, becoming an associate professor there in 1999. From 2000-2002, he was with the Wireless Systems Research Department at AT&T (Bell) Laboratories Research in Middletown, NJ. From 2002-2008, he was with Mitsubishi Electric Research Labs, Cambridge, MA, USA, most recently as Distinguished Member of Technical Staff and Chief Wireless Standards Architect. Concurrently he was also Professor and Chairholder for radio systems at Lund University, Sweden. Since 2009, he is Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Dr. Molisch has done research in the areas of SAW filters, radiative transfer in atomic vapors, atomic line filters, smart antennas, and wideband systems. His current research interests are measurement and modeling of mobile radio channels, UWB, cooperative communications, and MIMO systems. He has authored, co-authored or edited four books (among them the textbook "Wireless Communications, Wiley-IEEE Press), eleven book chapters, more than 110 journal papers, and numerous conference contributions, as well as more than 70 patents and more than 60 standards contributions.

March 25, 2009

CSI Assistant Professor Michael J. Neely has the 2 millionth paper published on IEEE Explore

Michael J. Neely, an assistant professor in the Communication Sciences Institute within the Electrical Engineering Department at USC, has a recent journal paper in the IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control that is marked as the 2 millionth paper published online at IEEE Explore. This marks a milestone in online IEEE publications. The paper appears in the March 2009 issue of IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, and is entitled "Intelligent Packet Dropping for Optimal Energy-Delay Tradeoffs in Wireless Downlinks." A free copy of the paper can be found here: PDF of article.

Michael J. Neely received B.S. degrees in both Electrical Engineering and Mathematics from the University of Maryland, College Park, in 1997. He then received a 3 year Department of Defense NDSEG Fellowship for graduate study at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he received an M.S. degree in EECS in 1999 and a Ph.D. in 2003. During the Summer of 2002, he worked as an intern in the Distributed Sensor Networks group at Draper Labs in Cambridge. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Communication Sciences Institute (CSI), within the Electrical Engineering Department at the University of Southern California. His research interests are in the areas of stochastic network optimization and queueing theory, with applications to wireless, satellite, mobile ad-hoc networks, and switching systems. He has co-authored a Foundations and Trends text on stochastic network optimization and cross-layer control (FnT 2006), and is part of the Junior team of the DARPA Information Theory for Mobile Ad-Hoc Networks project (IT-MANET). Michael received the NSF Career award in 2008. He is a member of Tau Beta Pi and Phi Beta Kappa.

February 6, 2009

CSI Professor Bob Scholtz elected to the National Academy of Engineering

Robert A. Scholtz, a professor in the Communication Sciences Institute of the Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering Department at USC, has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). Membership in the Academy is the highest professional distinction that can be accorded an engineer. Scholtz started the first university research program in ultra-wideband radio, and is recognized for outstanding contributions in the fields of utltra-wideband and spread-spectrum communications. His election to the NAE, together with the election of George Olah of the Viterbi School of Engineering, make the Viterbi school one of only six schools in the nation with two or more elected members this year. A news article about this story can be found here: "Olah, Scholtz Named to the National Academy of Engineering."

Robert A. Scholtz is a Distinguished Alumnus of the University of Cincinnati, where, as a Sheffield Scholar, he received the B.S. Degree in Electrical Engineering in 1958. He was a Hughes Masters and Doctoral Fellow while obtaining his MS and PhD degrees in Electrical Engineering from USC in 1960 and Stanford University in 1964 respectively. Dr. Scholtz, working on missile radar signal processing problems, remained part-time at Hughes Aircraft Co. until 1978. In 1963, Dr. Scholtz joined the faculty of the University of Southern California, where he is now the Fred H. Cole Professor of Engineering. From 1984 through 1989, he served as Director of USC's Communication Sciences Institute, and from 1994 to 2000 he was Chairman of the Electrical Engineering Systems Department. In 1996, Dr. Scholtz formed the Ultrawideband Radio Laboratory (UltRa Lab) to provide facilities for the design and test of impulse radio systems and other novel high-bandwidth high-data-rate wireless mobile communication links. He has served as a consultant to several corporations and government agencies.

His research interests include communication theory, synchronization, signal design, coding, adaptive processing, and pseudonoise generation, and their application to communications and radar systems. He has co-authored the books Spread Spectrum Communications, the Spread Spectrum Communications Handbook, and Basic Concepts in Information Theory and Coding.

Dr. Scholtz is a Fellow of the IEEE and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He has received many awards for his work, including the 1984 Donald G. Fink Prize, 1992 Senior Award of the IEEE Signal Processing Society, the 2003 S. A. Schelkunoff Prize from the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society. Dr. Scholtz is a co-recipient of the 2006 Eric E. Sumner Medal from the IEEE "for pioneering contributions to ultra-wide band communications science and technology."

June 19, 2008

CSI Professor Keith Chugg wins the 2008 Terman Award of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE)

Keith Chugg, professor in the Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering, received the 2008 F.E. Terman Award of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). The Terman Award is given annually to an outstanding young electrical engineering educator in recognition of the educator's contributions to the profession. It is named in honor of Frederick Emmons Terman, who served Stanford University in many capacities, including head of the elecrical engineering department, dean of the school of engineering, provost, vice president, and acting president. Terman is known for his mentoring and guidance of many engineering students who went on to establish successful businesses, including William Hewlett and David Packard.

Winners of the Terman award are honored for: 1. being principal author of an electrical engineering textbook published prior to June 1 of the year in which the author becomes 40 years of age and judged by peers to be outstanding by virtue of its original contribution to the field; 2. outstanding achievements in teaching, research, guidance of students and related activities; 3. being an electrical engineering educator under 45 years of age on June 1 of the year in which the award selection is made; and 4. being a full-time member of a college faculty and actively engaged in teaching in the United States or Canada at the time of award selection.

The book honored as part of the award is written by Keith (along with co-authors A. Anastasopoulos and X. Chen) and entitled Iterative Detection: Adaptivity, Complexity Reduction, and Applications, Kluwer Academic Press, 2001.

Keith M. Chugg (S'88-M'95) received the B.S. degree (high distinction) in Engineering from Harvey Mudd College, Claremont, CA in 1989 and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering (EE) from the University of Southern California (USC), Los Angeles, CA in 1990 and 1995, respectively. During the 1995-1996 academic year he was an Assistant Professor with the Electrical and Computer Engineering Dept., The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ. In 1996 he joined the EE Dept. at USC in 1996 where he is currently a Professor.

His research interests are in the general areas of signaling, detection, and estimation for digital communication and data storage systems. He is also interested in architectures for efficient implementation of the resulting algorithms. Along with his former Ph.D. students, A. Anastasopoulos and X. Chen, he is co-author of the book Iterative Detection: Adaptivity, Complexity Reduction, and Applications published by Kluwer Academic Press. He is a co-founder of TrellisWare Technologies, Inc., where he is Chief Scientist. He has served as an associate editor for the IEEE Transactions on Communications and was Program Co-Chair for the Communication Theory Symposium at Globecom 2002. He received the Fred W. Ellersick award for the best unclassified paper at MILCOM 2003.

April 08, 2008

Bilal Shaw wins Best Student Presentation in Quantum Information award at APS March Meeting

Bilal Shaw, a Ph.D. student in Quantum Information Processing working with Prof. Todd Brun, has won the Best Student Presentation Award in Quantum Information Theory at the American Physical Society (APS) March Meeting. The March Meeting is one of the largest Physics conferences in the world and it took place March 10-14, 2008, in New Orleans, LA.

Shaw won for his presentation of the work done in "Encoding One Logical Qubit Into Six Physical Qubits." This work was done in collabration with Mark Wilde, Ognyan Oreshkov, Issac Kremsky and Daniel Lidar. The award includes a cash prize, sponsored by the Group for Quantum Information (GQI) with funds from the Perimeter Institute in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. It also includes an invitation to visit the Perimeter Institute and give a full-length version of the winning talk.


February 19, 2008

CSI Assistant Professor Michael Neely Wins NSF CAREER Award

Michael Neely, assistant professor in the Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering, has been awarded a Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) grant by the National Science Foundation (NSF). This prestigious award supports the early career-development activities of faculty who most effectively integrate research and education within their academic institutions.

Prof. Neely's project is entitled "Analysis and Control of Network Delay," and concerns fundamental research on the analysis and control of delay in stochastic data networks, including wired networks and wireless networks with mobile nodes. While algorithms to optimize energy use and throughput in networks have been studied, little work has been done on the optimization of the most important parameter to the average user: delay. This is due to the complex models that must be employed. His novel approach recognizes that the solution of these difficult problems is related to optimization techniques applied to a different set of problems, and that energy-delay and utility-delay bounds can be obtained. His work also uses these bounds to find adaptive, low complexity procedures to achieve them for various types of applications.

Prof. Neely completed his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2003, and was appointed as assistant professor in January 2004. His research areas are in queueing analysis, dynamic optimization and resource allocation for both wired and wireless networks.

Alexander A. (Sandy) Sawchuk, Systems Chair of the Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering said "our faculty joins me in congratulating Mike Neely on his selection as an NSF CAREER awardee and its recognition of his research accomplishments in network modeling and analysis."


January 29, 2008

CSI Professor Solomon Golomb named Distinguished Professor of Electrical Engineering and Mathematics

Professor Solomon Golomb has recently been named "Distinguished Professor" of Electrical Engineering and Mathematics department by Provost C.L. Max Nikias. This title is a recognition for his outstanding contributions across multiple disciplines.

Professor Golomb has had a long and an illustrious career and has won many awards including the Claude E. Shannon Award and the Richard W. Hamming Gold Medal of the IEEE. Professor Golomb has over 250 publications and has made significant contributions in the areas of communication theory, information theory, combinatorial analysis and number theory. Professor Golomb has been at USC since 1963.


September 01, 2007

CSI student Raj receives Oakley Fellowship

K. Raj Kumar received an Oakley Fellowship for the academic year 2007-2008. The Oakley Fellowship is an Endowed Fellowship administered through the USC Graduate School.

Raj is originally from India and he is advised by Prof. Giuseppe Caire. His research centers on information theory and coding techniques for of multi-antenna channels, in wireless communications. Raj developed coding schemes for the Multi-Input Multi-Output (MIMO) fading channel based on algebraic lattices, generated by cyclic division algebras. New block and trellis codes have been developed, achieving the best known performance for the very-slowly varying fading channel, and provably achieving the optimal diversity-multiplexing tradeoff. Furthermore, these codes can be decoded efficiently using a sequential decoder, that exploits the lattice structure. Recently, Raj has been focussing on coding techniques for the relay channel with fading; notably, on the dynamic decode and forward scheme where he developed algebraic coding constructions that outperform any previously proposed code for this application. Broadly speaking, Raj's research is potentially relevant for the next generation of very high speed wireless networks.

September 01, 2007
  CSI students - Ozgun, Marcus and Satish - receive Annenberg Fellowship 
 

Left to Right: Prof. Urbashi Mitra, Satish Vedantam, Ozgun Bursalioglu, Marcus Urie, Prof. Keith Chugg and Prof. Giuseppe Caire.


Three Communication Sciences Institute graduate students - Ozgun Bursalioglu, Marcus Urie and Satish Vedantam - are the recipients of USC Annenberg Fellowships for doctoral students. These three students are among 100 graduate students who are collectively known as the USC Annenberg Fellows funded by $4 million a year in funding. The Annenberg Fellows conduct research in the areas of communication and digital media research. Three schools at USC participate in the Annenberg Fellows program: the Viterbi School of Engineering, the Annenberg School of Communication and the School of Cinematic Arts.

Ozgun is originally from Turkey and she is advised by Prof. Giuseppe Caire. Her research centers on joint source channel coding techniques for lossy transmission of analog sources over noisy channels. In particular, she is investigating the use of rateless codes for transmission of encoded images and video over binary-input output symmetric channels.

Marcus, who received his BSEE from Brigham Young University in Utah, works with Prof. Keith Chugg. His research focuses on cyclic graphical modeling for the design of complex systems. His work has applications in error correction coding, circuit design, and general inference problems.

Satish Vedantam, a native of India, is investigating the fundamental limits of joint communication and sensing for various types of wireless networks. His research has relevance for cognitive radio, underwater acoustic communications and radar networks. Satish is advised by Prof. Urbashi Mitra.


April 17, 2007

Best Student Paper Award 2007

Min-hsiu Hsieh won the Best Student Paper award for the paper "Correcting Quantum Errors with Entanglement'' Todd A. Brun, Igor Devetak and Min-Hsiu Hsieh, Science 314, 436-439 (2006). His paper appeared in the October 20, 2006 issue of the prestigious journal Science. 

This paper constructed a new class of quantum error correcting codes that draw on the quantum-mechanical resource of entanglement, and include previously discovered quantum error correcting codes as a special case.

 

Bo Zhang (center), Irfan Fazal (right) and Lin Zhang (left) won honourable mention at the Best Student Paper award for their work "Slow light on Gbit/s differential-phase-shift-keying signals" Bo Zhang, Lianshan Yan, Irfan Fazal, Lin Zhang, Alan E. Willner, Zhaoming Zhu, and Daniel J. Gauthier, Optics Express, Vol. 15, Issue 4, pp. 1878-1883.

They showed, for the first time, a phase-preserving slow light where a 10-Gb/s phase-modulated optical signal is delayed by as much as 42-ps. They further identified and analyzed slow-light-induced data-pattern-dependence and proposed a method to achieve a 3-dB distortion reduction.

April 17, 2007

 

Best Teaching Assistant Award 2007

Tom Halford (right) won the award for Best Teaching Assistant for graduate courses while Mark Wilde (left) won the same for undergraduate courses.

April 3, 2007

Ph.D. Student Matthew Brennan receives NSF Fellowship

Matthew Brennan, a CSI Ph.D. student, has received a prestigious National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Fellowship. Matt received his B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst and is currently completing his first year of graduate studies at USC.


January 3, 2007

Urbashi Mitra elected Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)

Professor Urbashi Mitra has been elected Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). The IEEE Fellow title honors people with outstanding professional and technical achievements in the broad fields of electrical engineering. IEEE is the leading technical organization in these fields, with 39 professional societies and publication of 128 transactions, journals and magazines representing a wide spectrum of technical interests. The IEEE traces its history to 1884 and has approximately 365,000 members in over 150 countries.


October 20, 2006

Work by Todd Brun, Igor Devetak and Min-Hsiu Hsieh Appears in Science

Work by two faculty members and a student of the Communication Sciences Institute has appeared in the October 20, 2006 issue of the prestigious journal Science. The paper ``Correcting quantum errors with entanglement'' presents a new class of entanglement-assisted quantum error-correcting codes which generalize the standard stabilizer codes which are widely used in quantum computation and quantum information theory. These codes have an algebraic structure similar to stabilizer codes, which are included as a special case.

There are well-known constructions which can be used to construct quantum error-correcting codes from classical linear codes; but these constructions can only be used for classical codes which satisfy a particular constraint (dual-containing codes). Entanglement-assisted codes, by constrast, have no such restriction. This may make it possible to construct straightforwardly quantum versions of high-performance modern codes (such as Turbo or LDPC codes), which has proven difficult within the standard stabilizer formalism.

September 13, 2006

Giuseppe Caire Receives a 2006 Okawa Foundation Research Grant

 

Giuseppe Caire, Professor of Electrical Engineering, is a recipient of a 2006 Research Grant from the Okawa Foundation for Information and Telecommunications. The Okawa Foundation was established in Japan in 1986 to provide funding for and give recognition to new studies in the information and telecommunications fields. The Okawa Foundation Grant recognizes and supports Prof. Caire's research on the topic "Understanding and Implementation of Shannon-Theoretic Multiuser Wireless Systems."

 


April 4, 2006

Ph.D. Student Nick Richard receives NSF Fellowship

Nick Richard, a CSI Ph.D. student, has received a prestigious National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Fellowship. Nick received his B.S.E.E. degree from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst and is currently completing his first year of graduate studies at USC.


March 23, 2006

Prof. Todd Brun Promoted to Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering

Todd Brun has been promoted to Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, with tenure. Prof. Brun's research is in quantum information processing, computation and communication. He has done outstanding work exploring the interplay between the theoretical, computational and application aspects of these fields.


March 2, 2006

Igor Devetak receives NSF CAREER AWARD

Igor Devetak, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering, has received a National Science Foundation (NSF) Faculty Early Career Award for the project "A High-Level Framework for a Unified Treatment of Quantum and Classical Information Theory and Thermodynamics." The goal of this work is to develop a modular mathematical formalism for quantum and classical information theory, in which coding theorems are phrased as inequalities between information processing resources such as entanglement and quantum communication.

The NSF CAREER program recognizes and supports the early career-development activities of those teacher-scholars who are most likely to become the academic leaders of the 21st century. CAREER awardees are selected on the basis of creative, career-development plans that effectively integrate research and education within the context of the mission of their institution.


January 24, 2006

Alan Willner Elected President of of the IEEE Lasers and Electro-Optics Society (LEOS)

On January 1, 2006, Alan Willner became the President of the Institute of Electronic and Electrical Engineers (IEEE) Lasers and Electro-Optics Society (LEOS) for a 2 year term (www.ieee.org and www.i-leos.org).

The IEEE LEOS has approximately 8,000 members world-wide, approximately 75% of LEOS members have a Ph.D. degree, and nearly half the members are from outside the United States. The IEEE LEOS sponsors or co-sponsors over 30 international technical conferences and 6 technical journal publications.


January 23, 2006

Viterbi Ultrawideband Specialist Wins IEEE Sumner Medal

Professor Robert A. Scholtz has been named a co-recipient of the 2006 IEEE Eric E. Sumner Award "for pioneering contributions to ultra-wide band communications science and technology." Scholtz has been a faculty member in the Viterbi School department of electrical engineering since 1963 and now holds the school's Fred H. Cole chair. For nearly a decade he has been studying how to use ultrawideband--brief signal pulses spread over a very wide band of the radio spectrum--for imaging, data transmission, and other tasks, and he now directs a research unit specializing in the field, the USC UltRA Laboratory. Scholtz shares the honor with his frequent ultra-wideband research collaborator and co-author, Moe Win of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.


September, 2005

Giuseppe Caire and Daniel Lidar join the CSI Faculty

Giuseppe Caire has joined USC-CSI as a Professor of Electrical Engineering. Prof. Caire's research is in the area of wireless communications and information theory. Prof. Caire received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering in 1994 from Politencnico di Torino, Italy. His previous position was with the Eurecom Institute, Sophia-Antipolis, France.

Daniel Lidar has joined CSI and has a joint appointment as Associate Professor in the Electrical Engineering and Chemestry departments at USC. Prof. Lidar received his Ph.D. in 1997 from Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His research interests are in the areas of quantum control and quantum computing. His previous position was with the University of Toronto.

January 24, 2004

2005 CSI Review to Coincide with Viterbi Conference

This year's CSI Research Review will coincide with a series of events to be held March 8-9, 2005. This includes the Viterbi Conference: Advancing Technology through Communication Sciences, a 1.5 day technical symposium. The annual Viterbi Lecture will take place on the evening of March 8 and will be given by Prof. Jacob Ziv of the Technion - Israel Institute of Technology. The Viterbi library at the newly dedicated Ronald Tutor Hall of Engineering will also be dedicated. For more information on this event, see the Viterbi School of Engineering page.


January 19, 2005

Brun receives NSF CAREER AWARD

Prof. Todd Brun has received the Faculty Early Career Award from the National Science Foundation for work on "Realistic models and simulations of systems for quantum information processing".

The (NSF) CAREER program recognizes and supports the early career-development activities of those teacher-scholars who are most likely to become the academic leaders of the 21st century. CAREER awardees are selected on the basis of creative, career-development plans that effectively integrate research and education within the context of the mission of their institution.


September 7, 2004

Andrew Viterbi and Igor Devetak join the CSI Faculty

Andrew Viterbi has been named USC Presidential Chair Professor. As a co-founder of Linkabit and Qualcomm, Inc., Dr. Viterbi has been instrumental in transitioning advances in coding, information theory, and digital communications to government and commercial communication systems. Dr. Viterbi received his Ph.D. from USC.

Igor Devetak will officially join the CSI faculty in January 2005. Prof. Devetak received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Cornell University in 2002. His research interests are in the area of quantum information theory. He comes to USC after completing a post-doctoral research appointment at IBM's T.J. Watson Research Center under the supervision of Dr. Charles Bennett.

March 2, 2004

USC Engineering is now the Viterbi School

USC has announced that the School of Engineering received a $52 million naming gift from Andrew and Erna Viterbi. In remarks during the ceromony held March 2, Dr. Viterbi mentioned his interaction his CSI faculty over the years as a rewarding connection to the university. Dr. Viterbi received his Ph.D. from USC in Electrical Engineering.


February 26, 2004

Representatives of fourteen corporations and research organizations attended the 2004 CSI Research Review on Feb. 26, 2004. The program included a Keynote talk by Dr. Roberto Padovani, CTO of Qualcomm, Inc., research presentations by six CSI faculty, and 24 poster presentations by CSI graduate students. More information on the review can be found here with presentation videos and slides available in the affiliates-only section.

J
anuary 28, 2004

Professor Zhen Zhang has been named IEEE Fellow for "contributions to source coding theory and information inequalities".

January 15, 2004

Professor Alan Willner has been named IEEE Fellow for "contributions to the fundamental understanding and mitigation of key limitations of lightwave transmission systems and networks". Prof. Willner is also a Fellow of the Optical Society of America.


October 30, 2003

Keith Chugg and Mingrui Zhu win MILCOM best paper award

Professor Keith Chugg and his Ph.D. student Mingrui Zhu were awarded the Fred W. Ellersick Award for best paper in the unclassified program at the IEEE Conference on Military Communications (MILCOM). The paper, entitled "Iterative Message Passing Techniques for Rapid Code Acquisition," was presented at MILCOM in Boston, on October 16, 2003 by Prof. Chugg. The work was supported by the Army Research Office via a Multi-University Research Inititive (MURI) grant lead by Professor Robert Scholtz.


October 15, 2003

USC, in partnership with five University of California campuses and the University of Delaware, has won a National Science Foundation Networking Research Testbed grant of over $5.5 million. WHYNET, a wireless hybrid networked testbed, will provide a testbed for researchers to evaluate the impact of new technologies on application level performance, using scalable and realistic scenarios. USC will be providing infrastructure and research on the Ultrawideband portion of the testbed.


August 28, 2003

Robert Scholtz Appointed to The Fred H. Cole Professorship in Engineering

The Fred H. Cole Professorship in Engineering will be held by Robert Scholtz, professor of electrical engineering systems. A faculty member for 40 years, the much-honored Scholtz began the first university research program in ultra-wideband radio, a promising technology with applications in wireless networks, security systems and consumer electronics. C. Nikias, dean of the School of Engineering said: “Bob Scholtz has created and mentored a credible and successful research effort in both spread spectrum communications and ultra-wideband radio that reaches far beyond the wrought iron fences of our campus.”


July 3, 2003

Lloyd Welch Presents the Shannon Lecture at ISIT 2003 in Yokohama, Japan

Emeritus Professor Lloyd R. Welch, recipient of the 2003 Claude E. Shannon Award, presented the Shannon Lecture at the International Symposium on Information Theory, held in Yokohama, Japan, June 29-July 4, 2004.

The Shannon Award is the highest honor granted by the IEEE's Information Theory Society. It is given for "consistent and profound contributions to the field of information theory".
 


May 9, 2003

Robert Scholtz Wins 2003 Shelkunoff Transactions Prize Paper

Professor Robert A. Scholtz and his coauthors Jean-Marc Cramer and Moe
Win have been chosen as the recipients of the 2003 A. Shelkunoff
Transactions Prize Paper Award of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation
Society.


April 30, 2003

Sol Golomb, a 40-year faculty member, becomes only the third person affiliated with the School to hold dual membership in the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering.

USC School of Engineering - Article
 


March 3, 2003

A team of faculty from five major research groups in the School of Enineering recently received a $3.6 million award from the Defense Advanced Research projects Agency (DARPA).